Richard CROSS (1812–1893)
His wife Mrs Ruth CROSS, née Parrott (1817–1891)
Their son Thomas CROSS (1842–1922), and their daughters Miss Ruth Ann CROSS (1844–1915),
Miss Sarah Ann CROSS (1854–1890), and Miss Priscilla CROSS (1848–1935)
Their infant daughters Jane CROSS (1860–1863) and Lydia CROSS (1862–1863)
St Michael section: Row 16a, Grave D48

Cross family

 

IN LOVING MEMORY OF
SARAH ANN
DAUGHTER OF
RICHARD AND RUTH CROSS
WHO DIED APRIL 15 – 1890
AGED 36 YEARS.

ALSO OF
JANE AND LYDIA
WHO DIED IN INFANCY

ALSO IN
AFFECTIONATE REMEMBRANCE OF
RUTH
THE BELOVED WIFE OF
RICHARD CROSS
WHO DIED JUNE 17 – 1891
aged 74 years.

ALSO IN LOVING MEMORY OF
RICHARD CROSS
WHO DIED MARCH 25 – 1895
IN HIS 83RD YEAR

–––

“EVEN SO THEM ALSO WHICH SLEEP IN JESUS WILL GOD BRING WITH HIM”
1 THESS: IV.14.

“CHRIST IS ALL, AND IN ALL”
COL: iii.2.

“TO AN INHERITANCE INCORRUPTIBLE”
I. PETER: I.4

 

Also three twentieth-century inscriptions on the kerbs, below:

Left kerb:  ALSO IN LOVING MEMORY OF THEIR ELDEST SON THOMAS WHO DIED FEB. 15, 1922
Right kerb:  ALSO IN LOVING MEMORY OF THEIR ELDEST DAUGHTER RUTH ANN WHO DIED FEBRUARY 22, 1915
Front kerb:  ALSO IN LOVING MEMORY OF PRISCILLA THEIR THIRD DAUGHTER / WHO DIED APRIL 19, 1935

Richard Cross was born in Twyford, Buckinghamshire on 7 April 1812 and baptised there on 18 May. He was the son of John Cross and his wife Ann, who had nine other children baptised at Twyford: Jane (1797), Elizabeth (1798), Mary (1800), William (1802), John (1804), Ann (1806), Thomas (1809), Robert (1810), and Sarah (1815). In 1838 Richard (26) took over the grocery business of Daniel Bolton at 22 Cornmarket Street, Oxford.

Ruth Parrott was born in Forest Hill, Oxfordshire in 1817 and baptised there on 4 May. She was the daughter of the farmer Thomas Parrott and his wife Fanny, who had seven other children baptised at that church: Maria (1812), John (1815), Elizabeth (1819), Sarah (1821), Thomas (1823), Jane (1826), and Edward (1829).

In the third quarter of 1838 at Waterperry, Richard Cross, described as a grocer of St Michael's parish in Oxford, married Ruth Parrott of Waterperry. They had fourteen children:

  • John Cross (born at 22 Cornmarket Street, Oxford in 1839 and baptised at St Michael's Church on 18 June); died aged four months and buried in St Michael's churchyard on 22 September)
  • Richard Cross (born at 22 Cornmarket Street, Oxford in 1840 and baptised at St Michael's Church on 6 September); died in infancy and buried at St Michael's churchyard on 20 September)
  • Thomas Cross (born at 22 Cornmarket Street, Oxford in 1842 and baptised at St Michael's Church on 3 October)
  • Ruth Ann Cross (born at 22 Cornmarket Street, Oxford in 1844 and baptised at St Michael's Church on 19 January)
  • Elizabeth Cross (born at 22 Cornmarket Street, Oxford in 1845 and baptised at St Michael's Church on 20 June)
  • Richard Wilberforce Cross (born at 22 Cornmarket Street, Oxford in 1846 and baptised at St Michael's Church on 23 February 1848)
  • Priscilla Cross (born at 22 Cornmarket Street, Oxford in 1848 and baptised at St Michael's Church on 19 May)
  • Jane Cross (first with this name, born at 22 Cornmarket Street, Oxford in 1850 and baptised at St Michael's Church on 1 September); appears to have died between early 1851 and late 1860, but presumably buried elsewhere as not mentioned on the grave
  • Helen Mary Cross (born at 22 Cornmarket Street, Oxford in 1851 and baptised at St Michael's Church on 2 November)
  • Samuel Cross (born at 22 Cornmarket Street, Oxford in 1852 and baptised at St Michael's Church on 2 January 1853)
  • Sarah Ann Cross (born at 22 Cornmarket Street, Oxford in 1854 and baptised at St Michael's Church on 31 May)
  • Fanny Cross (born in Oxford in 1856/7, reg. first quarter of 1857)
  • Jane Cross (second with this name, born at 22 Cornmarket Street, Oxford in 1860 and baptised at St Michael's Church on 23 November); died aged two and buried on 13 May 1863)
  • Lydia Cross (born at 22 Cornmarket Street, Oxford in 1862 and baptised at St Michael's Church on 26 October); died aged one and buried on 17 May 1863.

 

22 Cornmarket

Robson's Directory for 1839 describes Richard Cross as a Grocer & Cheesemonger at 22 Cornmarket Street, which was in St Michael's parish. He and his wife Ruth settled over that shop after their marriage. The photograph on the right shows what it would have looked like in Cross's day: it is now the right-hand side of Smith's, which was rebuilt in the twentieth century.

Their first two children died in infancy: John in 1839 and Richard in 1840. They are not mentioned on this grave, presumably because they were buried in St Michael's churchyard rather than in St Sepulchre's Cemetery (which did not open until 1848).

At the time of the 1841 census Richard and Ruth, with both their children dead, were living alone over their grocer's shop at 22 Cornmarket Street.

The recognizance of Richard Cross, grocer on 1 December 1845 can be seen at the Oxfordshire History Centre (QS1846/1/L2/69).

On 16 January 1847 Jackson's Oxford Journal reported that two men were “charged with stealing 27lb of cheese, value 8s. the property of Mr. Richard Cross, grocer”.

In July 1848 Richard Cross was elected Guardian for the Parish of St Michael, but was disqualified in September 1854 “in consequence of his having a contract for the supply of some grocery with the late Board”.

At the time of the 1851 census Richard (38) and Ruth (32) were living at 22 Cornmarket Street with their children Thomas (8), Ruth Ann (7), Elizabeth (5), Richard Wilberforce (4), Priscilla (2) and Jane (1), plus three servants. Their daughter Jane Cross (the first) must have died between early 1851 and late 1860, when they gave that same name to new baby. She appears to have been away from home when she died, and is presumably buried elsewhere.

In 1861 Richard (49) and Ruth (44) were living at 22 Cornmarket Street with their children Thomas (18), Ruth Ann (17), Priscilla (12), Helen or Ellen Mary (9), Samuel (8), Sarah Ann (7), Fanny (4), and a second daughter given the name Jane (six months), plus an apprentice and two servants. Their daughter Elizabeth (15) was boarding at Brent Lodge School in Middlesex, and their son Richard (14) at Totteridge Park School in Hertfordshire.

Their youngest child Lydia was born the following year. Both their youngest children died in infancy, and were buried within four days of each other in May 1863 (presumably in this grave, as Richard & Ruth Cross had moved away from St Michael's parish by the time they buried another daughter):

† Jane Cross II died at 22 Cornmarket Street at the age of two in May 1863 and was buried at St Sepulchre’s Cemetery on 13 May (burial recorded in the parish register of St Michael's Church).

† Lydia Cross died at 22 Cornmarket Street at the age of one in May 1863 and was buried at St Sepulchre’s Cemetery on 17 May (burial recorded in the parish register of St Michael's Church).

In April 1867 another theft took place at Cross's grocer's shop, and a man “was indicted for stealing 21lbs of sugar, on the 2nd March, the property of Richard Cross. The prisoner went into the shop, and taking the sugar, was pursued and captured with it in his possession”. He was sentenced to seven years' penal servitude.

In 1871 Richard (57) and Ruth (54) were living at 22 Cornmarket Street with six of their children: Thomas (28), who was a grocer's assistant, and Elizabeth (25), Priscilla (22), Helen (29), Sarah Ann (17), and Fanny (14). Also living with them were a shopman and two servants, and their lodger, who was the Curate of St Ebbe's. Their daughter Ruth Ann (27) is hard to find, but was home again in 1881; their son Richard (24) is missing from this and all subsequent censuses, and may have emigrated; and Samuel (18) was probably abroad too, as he was married in Bangkok three years later.

Their daughter Elizabeth was married in 1878:

  • On 24 January 1878 at St Michael's Church, Elizabeth Cross married Thomas Brookes Smith, born in Great Ness, Shropshire in 1849, the only son of the late Samuel Smith of High Ercell, Shropshire. An announcement was placed in Jackson's Oxford Journal.

In 1881 Richard (68) and Ruth (63) were still at 22 Cornmarket Street with two of their children, Ruth Ann (37) and Samuel (27), who was a grocer's assistant, plus one servant. Their other five unmarried children were all away from home: Thomas (38), described as a grocer, was boarding in Great Malvern; Priscilla (32) was working as a governess for the Wilkinson family at Plas Newydd Hall, Denbighshire; Sarah (27) was a governess at the Bridlington Collegiate School in Yorkshire; Helen (26) was paying a visit to the family of her uncle John Cross (77), a farmer in Middle Claydon, Buckinghamshire; and Fanny (24) was paying a visit to the Tarrant family in Witney.

Their son Samuel was married in 1884:

  • On 13 December 1884 at the British Consulate General, Bangkok, Siam and at the American Presidential Mission in Wang Hlang, Samuel Cross married Lillian M. Linnelle, late of Waverly, New York. An announcement was placed in Jackson's Oxford Journal.

In 1885 Richard Cross retired, and was immediately appointed a Justice of the Peace. The family moved to Ockwells, 1 Church Walk in Ss Philip & James's parish.

Their daughter Sarah Ann was working as a nurse in Derby by 1890, when she died of typhoid there. Her body was returned to Oxford by rail, and she was the first adult buried in the family grave:

† Miss Sarah Ann Cross died at Derby at the age of 35 on 15 April 1890 and was buried at St Sepulchre’s Cemetery on 19 April (burial recorded in the parish register of St Michael's Church).

This report on her funeral appeared in Jackson’s Oxford Journal on 26 April 1890:

FUNERAL OF MISS CROSS.— Miss Cross, daughter of Mr. Richard Cross, of No. 1, Church Walk, in this city, who has been for some time one of the head nurses in the Hospital at Derby, died there on Tuesday, April 15, from typhoid fever and bronchitis, the former undoubtedly caused by the defective drainage of the Infirmary. She was greatly beloved at the Hospital, her bright, cheerful, kind manner endearing her to all, to doctors, nurses, and especially the suffering patients. During Miss Cross’s illness both the medical and nursing staff bestowed all skill and attention possible but it was of no avail. The body was brought to Oxford by the Midland and Great Western Railway on Friday evening last, and taken to the residence of her father, and on Saturday afternoon her mortal remains were conveyed to their last resting-place, a brick grave in St. Michael’s portion of St. Sepulchre’s Cemetery, Jericho. The coffin, which was of polished oak, bore the following inscription:— “SARAH ANN CROSS, died April 15, 1890, aged 35 years.” Besides the twelve mourners, consisting of her parents, sisters, brother, and near relatives, many friends assembled in the Cemetery Chapel and followed to the grave. The Rev. Canon Christopher officiated, and at the conclusion of the service Cowper’s beautiful hymn, “There is a fountain filled with blood,” was sung. Canon Christopher then, with much feeling, gave a short address from the first Epistle of St. Peter, 1st chapter, 3rd verse to the 9th inclusive, and spoke of the self-denying work she had done for Jesus, out of love to Him, and had been taken away in the midst of it. The service closed with the Blessing. A number of beautiful wreaths, several of which were sent from Derby by the matron, doctors, nurses, and servants of the Hospital, covered the coffin. The funeral arrangements were carried out by Mr. Lloyd, of Derby, and Mr. C. Badcock, Queen-street, Oxford.

Their daughter Helen was married later in 1890:

  • On 11 September 1890 at Ss Philip & James's Church, Helen Mary Cross (38) of 1 Church Walk married John Badcock (53), a draper of 12 Queen Street, the son of the deceased cabinet-maker William Badcock. An announcement was placed in Jackson's Oxford Journal.

At the time of the 1891 census Richard Cross (78) and Ruth (47) were living at 1 Church Walk with their four unmarried children Thomas (48), Ruth (47), Priscilla (42), and Fanny (34), plus a servant.

Mrs Ruth Cross died later in 1891:

† Mrs Ruth Cross née Parrott died at 1 Church Walk at the age of 74 on 17 June 1891 and was buried at St Sepulchre’s Cemetery on 22 June (burial recorded in the parish register of St Michael's Church).

Her effects came to £1,636 2s. 11d., and her husband was her executor.

Richard Cross died in 1895:

† Richard Cross died at 1 Church Walk at the age of 82 on 25 March 1895 and was buried at St Sepulchre’s Cemetery on 30 March (burial recorded in the parish register of St Michael's Church).

His death notice in Jackson's Oxford Journal read: “March 25, at 1, Church-walk, Oxford, Richard Cross, J.P., in his 83rd year.” He also had a short obituary:

DEATH OF MR. JUSTICE CROSS.—We regret to announce the death on Monday last, at his residence, “Ockwells,” Church-Walk, Woodstock-road, in this city, of Mr. Richard Cross, at the advanced age of nearly 83 years. He was a son of Mr. John Cross, of Twyford, Bucks, and he succeeded to the business of grocer in Cornmarket-street, in 1838, of Mr. Daniel Bolton, which he carried on for the long period of 47 years. He took an active part in the work of the Oxford Board of Guardians for upwards of 40 years, being for a long period one of the vice-chairmen; he was also a member of the old Paving Commissioners, and a trustee of St. Michael's parish charities. He was appointed a Justice of the Peace in 1885, and for several years was a very regular attendant on the bench, but he has not appeared there since September, 1893. He was born on 7th April 1812, and would therefore if he had lived to Sunday week have been 83 years old. Although he was not a robust man he had a strong constitution, but for the last year and a half he had been in failing health. The funeral takes place this day (Saturday).

His grant of probate can be viewed at the Oxfordshire History Centre (Marshall & Galpin Solicitors collection, SL38/1/22W/1). His effects came to £19,894 0s. 6d., and his executors were the grocer William Henry Tarrant the younger, his son Thomas, and the coach merchant Henry Franklin.

By the time of the 1901 census three of his unmarried children were living at 7 Winchester Road in Oxford, namely Thomas (58), who was a retired grocer, and Ruth (57) and Fanny (44). They employed a housemaid and a general servant.


Thomas Cross, and his sister Miss Fanny Cross

Thomas Cross (born 1842) who does not appear to have married, was aged 68 in 1911 and still living at 7 Winchester Road with his sister Fanny and one servant. He died there in 1922:

† Thomas Cross died at 7 Winchester Road, Oxford at the age of 79 on 15 February 1922 and was buried at St Sepulchre’s Cemetery on 18 February (burial recorded in the parish register of St Michael's Church).

His effects came to £6,296 4s. 10d., and his executors were his sister Fanny Cross and the farmer Sydney Brookes Smith.

Fanny Cross (born 1856/7) never married. She died at 21 Winchester Road, Oxford at the age of 84 on 15 January 1941, but was not buried in this grave. Her effects came to £12,974 8s. 1d., and her executors were Frank Herbert Tims, a solicitor's managing clerk, and Mrs Mabel Annie Clarke. She does not appear to have been buried in this grave, which presumably was deemed full after three new burials between 1915 and 1935.


Miss Ruth Ann Cross

Ruth (born 1844) was doing “Deaconess work” in London in 1911, living at Edinburgh Castle, Rhodeswell Road, Limehouse with three other women doing the same work and a housekeeper and a housemaid.

Ruth was back with her brother Thomas in Oxford in 1915, when she died at his house

† Miss Ruth Ann Cross died at 7 Winchester Road, Oxford at the age of 71 on 22 February 1915 and was buried at St Sepulchre’s Cemetery on 27 February (burial recorded in the parish register of St Michael's Church).

Her effects came to £7,889 19s. 9d., and her executors were the farmer Richard Wilfred Smith and the grocer Ernest Tarrant. Her grant of probate can be seen in the Oxfordshire History Centre, SL38/1/41W/2.
of 7 Winchester


Miss Priscilla Cross

Priscilla (born 1848), who was still living with her parents in 1891, is hard to find in the 1901 and 1911 censuses. She died in 1935:

† Miss Priscilla Cross died at 181 Banbury Road, Oxford at the age of 87 on 19 April 1935 and was buried at St Sepulchre’s Cemetery on 22 April (burial recorded in the parish register of St Michael's Church).

Her effects came to £10,796 and her executors were Frank Herbert Tims, a solicitor's managing clerk, and the retired draper Ernest Edward Wilson. Her grant of probate can be seen in the Oxfordshire History Centre, SL38/1/61W/7
of 177 Banbury


The three married children of Richard and Ruth Cross
  • Elizabeth Cross, Mrs Smith (born 1845) was aged 35 in 1881 and living at Steeple Claydon with her husband Thomas Brookes Smith (32), who was a farmer of 146 acres employing three men and two boys, and their sons Sydney (2) and Richard (eleven months), plus a general servant and a nurse. In 1891 they were at Lion Hill Farm, East Claydon, and had three more children, Margaret (9), Mabel (6), and Philip (1), and employed a governess and a servant. In 1911 they were at Home Farm, Tyringham, Buckinghamshire. Elizabeth was probably already dead when her husband died at Newport Pagnell on 7 June 1920: his effects came to £5,730 13s. 9d., and their son Sydney Brookes Smith, a farmer, was one was one of his executors.
  • Helen Mary Cross, Mrs Badcock (born 1851) and her husband John had no children. In 1901 Helen (49) was living at 117 Woodstock Road with John (64), who was a retired draper, her niece Mabel A. Smith (16), and a servant. In 1911 she was a widow of 59, living alone at 3 Church Walk with a servant. Helen's home was still at 3 Church Walk when on 21 November 1930 at the age of 79 she died at Walkley Village, Sheffield. Her effects came to £6,404 11s. 2d., and her executor was the retired draper Ernest Edward Wilson.
  • Samuel Cross (born 1852) and his wife Lillian are hard to trace after their marriage in Bangkok in 1884, and probably stayed abroad.

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