Henry Casson Barnes BAZELY (1842–1883)
His wife Mrs Louisa BAZELY, née Boothby (1856–1918)
St Michael section: Row 14, Grave C45½

Henry Bazeley

TO THE DEAR MEMORY OF HENRY C. B. BAZELY. B.C.L. BRASENOSE COLLEGE
PRESBYTER IN THE CHURCH OF GOD / (MINISTER OF CHURCH OF SCOTLAND IN OXFORD)
BORN SEPTEMBER 4TH 1842. FELL ASLEEP IN JESUS MARCH 1ST 1883

YEA, THOUGH I WALK IN DEATH’S DARK VALE / YET WILL I FEAR NONE ILL
FOR THOU ART WITH ME AND THY ROD / AND STAFF ME COMFORT STILL   PSALM XXIII:4

–––––––––

AND OF LOUISA HIS WIFE / 2ND DAUGHTER OF G. W. BOOTHBY R.N / BORN APRIL 3RD, 1856, DIED MAY 23RD, 1918

WEEPING MAY ENDURE FOR A NIGHT BUT JOY COMETH IN THE MORNING

Henry Casson Barnes Bazely was born at All Saints Rectory, Poplar, London on 4 September 1842. He was the only surviving child of the Rector, Thomas Tyssen Bazely, and his wife Julia Shipdem.

At the time of the 1851 census Henry (8) was at home in the Rectory in Poplar with his parents and three servants (a nurse, housemaid, and cook).

By the time of the 1861 census Henry’s father had retired and the family was living at 1 James Villas, Poonah Place, Tunbridge Wells with two servants (a housemaid and cook). Henry (18) was at home from Radley School on census night, and on 1 June that year he was matriculated at the University of Oxford from Brasenose College, where his father had been a Fellow from 1831 to 1839. He completed his degree in Literae Humaniores in 1863, and in 1868 revealed his decision to leave the Church of England by taking the degree of Bachelor of Civil Law (B.C.L.) instead of the usual M.A., as for the latter he would have had to subscribe to the Thirty-nine Articles.

He became a lay preacher of the Church of Scotland, and, according to The Times,

devoted himself to all kinds of outdoor and irregular preaching in Oxford, his audiences consisting largely of working people. He sacrificed much for the humbler classes, and a Hebrew entry in his diary records how he disposed of his gold chain and other valuables to provide a tea for some of his hearers. He was to be seen preaching every Sunday evening at the Martyrs’ Memorial in Oxford.

After being formally licensed by the Presbytery of Edinburgh, he hired a meeting house in Alfred Street, Oxford in 1871, where he conducted worship according to the strict rites of the Church of Scotland. The Times (5 January 1887) reported that “Bazely was well known by sight and name to every on in the city and University of Oxford, and all admired his fervour and his unselfishness.” From the 1870s he always had a stall at St Giles’s Fair selling bibles, testaments, and religious works.

Bazely’s mother Julia died in the Dover district towards the middle of 1876, and he inherited money from her: whereupon he built at his own expense a Scotch church in Nelson Street, Jericho, Oxford where he ministered until his death.

On 6 August 1880, at the National Scotch Church, Crown Court London, Henry Bazely married Louisa Boothby (born at Golpalpur, Orissa, India on 3 April 1856, the second daughter of the late George William Boothby of Cuttack, Bengal, who was a Commander in the Royal Navy, and his wife Harriet Glass). At the time of the 1881 census they were living at 32 New Inn Hall Street, Oxford with a young scholar boarding with them, and two servants (a cook and a housemaid). They had one son:

  • George Henry Boothby Bazely (born at 32 New Inn Hall Street, Oxford on 10 August 1881 and christened at the National Scottish Church, Oxford on 3 September).

Less than three years after his marriage, on 1 March 1883, Bazely died of Bright’s disease:

Henry Casson Barnes Bazely died at 32 New Inn Hall Street at the age of 40 on 1 March 1883. The funeral service was held at his Scotch Church in Nelson Street on 7 March 1883, followed by interment at St Sepulchre’s Cemetery (burial recorded in the parish register of St Michael’s Church).

His personal estate came to £7,428 16s. 11d.

The following obituary appeared in Jackson’s Oxford Journal on 3 March 1883:

DEATH OF THE REV. HENRY C. B. BAZELY.—Many in Oxford will mourn as for a brother the Rev. Henry C. B. Bazely, B.C.L., of Brasenose College, who fell asleep in Jesus on Thursday last, while prayer was being offered at the mid-day meeting in the Corn Exchange for his speedy release from suffering. He was the only surviving child of the Rev. Thomas Tyssen Bazely, of Dover, Fellow and Tutor of Brasenose 1831–39, Rector of Poplar 1839–60. He was born at All Saints Rectory, Poplar, Sept. 4, 1842. Radley was his School under Dr. Sewell. He was a Scholar and Hulmeian Exhibitioner of Brasenose. He obtained a First Class in Classical Moderations Easter Term 1863, and a Second Class in the Final Classical School in Michaelmas Term, 1865. He was a Denyer and Johnson Theological Scholar in 1868. He was known as one of the best read and most able of the private tutors in Oxford for the Theological School. One of his pupils is a Presbyter of the Established Church of Scotland. With him he spent portions of his vacations. He naturally placed before him the most able books on Presbyterianism, with the result that Mr. Bazely became a Presbyterian, and after a time was ordained a Presbyter of the Church of Scotland, and built at his own expense a small Church in Jericho, Oxford, which he served gratuitously. But it is as a devout, humble-minded, zealous Christian worker in the Gospel among the poor that Mr. Bazely will be chiefly remembered in Oxford. For years after his own evening service he preached the Gospel at the Martyrs’ Memorial. He never received any stipend whatever, nor was he ever fully reimbursed for the ordinary expenses of his Church. He promoted Evangelistic meetings at the Town Hall. For years he set up a stall for the sale of the Bible and Christian books in all the fairs in and near Oxford. He attended the race courses at Abingdon and Ascot and elsewhere to give away tracts and preach when it was possible. He was hardly ever missing at the prayer meeting held daily in Saint Aldate’s Rectory at 7.30 a.m., and his spiritual intelligent expositions often given at them will not soon be forgotten by those who heard them. It is believed that the eye of his dearest friend never detected in their superior ease, selfishness, or pride. The glory of God was the object of his life. The love of Christ constrained him to live for Him. By the grace of God he was what he was. His learning was consecrated to the extension of the influence of the Gospel. His lectures to the Christian Young Men’s Association on the “Evidences of Christianity,” and his Bible classes were invaluable to some of those who attended them. His holy consistent example adorned the doctrine of God, his saviour. He was married in August, 1880, and leaves a young widow and an infant son. His venerable father was with him for some weeks before his death. The funeral will take place on Tuesday, at 12.30, at Jericho Cemetery, after a service in his Church in Nelson-street, Jericho.

His funeral was duly reported in the next edition of Jackson’s Oxford Journal on 10 March 1883

FUNERAL OF THE REV. H. C. B. BAZELY
The funeral of this highly-respected gentleman, whose death we recorded last week, took place at St. Sepulchre’s Cemetery, Walton-street. The body was conveyed in Mr. Stroud’s open hearse from the residence in New Inn Hall-street, by the Martyrs’ Memorial, where Mr. Bazely had held so many evening services, along Beaumont-street and Walton-street to the Scotch Church in Nelson-street, where a portion of the Burial Service was read by the Rev. J. E. Walker, of Cheltenham, who also read a portion of Scripture and offered prayer. The Scotch version of the 23rd Psalm was also sung. The Church, which was hung with black, was crowded during the service, and a very large number of persons were unable to obtain admittance. Notwithstanding that there was a bitterly cold north wind, with occasional snowstorms, the whole line of the route from the Church to the Cemetery was lined with people, principally from Jericho, among whom Mr. Bazely’s work has chiefly been carried on; and at the Cemetery itself large numbers of persons patiently waited for the arrival of the cortège. The mourners were as follows:—First carriage—Mrs. Bazely (the widow), Rev. T. T. Bazely (the father), Miss Boothby, and Colonel W. J. Frampton (cousin of the deceased). Second carriage—Rev. J. E. Walker, Rev. A. M. W. Christopher, Rev. J. S. Frampton (cousin of the deceased), and the Rev. J. W. Nowell, Rector of Poplar. Third carriage—Rev. C. J. Black, Vicar of Burley (formerly Curate to the Rev. T. T. Bazely), Rev. F. S. Webster, E. Whitfield, Esq., and Mrs. Whitfield. Fourth carriage—Dr. Guinness, Rev. G. L. Kemp, Rev. F. K. Aglionby, and Miss Skene; and the fifth carriage contained the nurse, servants, and the infant son of the deceased dressed in white. A considerable number of undergraduates, including those who helped Mr. Bazely in his Martyrs’ Memorial services, were present, and preceded the hearse, and among those who were at the Cemetery were Professor Legge, the Revds. J. Arkell, E. A. Knox, F. J. Chavasse, H. G. Grey, W. B. Duggan, R. S. Mylne, A. G. Norman, and W. Huckney; Mr. and Mrs. Thornton, Miss Wyatt, &c. On arriving at the vault, which is of brick, and is situate a few yards from the door of the Chapel, the remainder of the service was read by the Rev. J. E. Walker in an exceedingly impressive manner, and after he had offered up a special extempore prayer, the Benediction was pronounced by the Rev. A. M. W. Christopher. The coffin, which was of polished oak, with massive plain brass furniture, was covered with wreaths of beautiful flowers and other floral tributes of affection a and respect, and it bore the following inscription on a brass plate:—

HENRY/ CASSON BARNES BAZELY, B.C.L.,
Minister of the / Church of Scotland / in Oxford
Born / 4th September, 1842
Fell asleep in Jesus / March 1st, 1883.

The funeral arrangements were ably carried out by Messrs. Elliston and Cavell, of Magdalen-street.

Edward Lee Hicks had been been elected a Scholar of Brasenose on the same day as Bazely, and they were good friends. Hicks became Rector of Fenny Compton and later Bishop of Lincoln, and wrote a book about Bazely and his work in Oxford: see E. L. Hicks, Henry Bazely, the Oxford Evangelist. A Memoir (Macmillan & Co., 1887).

Bazely’s father Thomas Tyssen Bazely died in Dover district at the age of 86 on 14 November 1894.

Bazely’s widow Louisa Bazely did not remarry. At the time of the 1891 census she was still living at 32 New Inn Hall Street with her son George Henry (9) and two servants. By 1901 they were at 6 Westbourne Mansions, Paddington, and George Henry (19) was an undergraduate at Brasenose College, Oxford; and in 1911 she was living with just one servant at Granville House, Portman Square.

† Mrs Louisa Bazely née Boothby died at Eliot Vale Cottage, Blackheath, Kent at the age of 62 on 23 May 1918 and was buried in St Sepulchre’s Cemetery with her husband on 31 May (burial recorded in parish register of St Michael’s Church).

Their only son George Henry Boothby Bazely married Renée Marguerite Vive of Besançon, France at St George’s in Paris on 19 May 1919. He died at 62 rue du Général de Gaulle, Ile d’Yeu Vendée, France on 21 February 1954. His effects came to £2,161 10s. 8d.


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